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MRIs that will detect the area of the damaged hppd brain


Hppd13
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I’m going to list the most powerful MRIs that will detect the area of the damaged brain 

Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, or less commonly, SPET) is a nuclear medicine tomographic imaging technique using gamma rays
Https://youtube.com/watch?v=b3Dtrt5pJ7U&feature=share

Second imaging : Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting changes associated with blood flow.
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/acn3.50986

Third imaging : 11.7 teslas: The World-Record Magnetic Field Generated by a Human MRI Magnet
https://www.cea.fr/english/Pages/News/premieres-images-irm-iseult-2021.aspx

Fourth imaging : Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is the newest, most advanced method of recording and evaluating the brain while it is actively functioning. This recording provides a direct measurement of the ongoing function of normal neurons and can pinpoint the location of malfunctioning neurons.

That’s the goal friends, if we pass these machines. The damage in Our Hppd brain will be revealed

Tell me what you think !

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This is awesome and fascinating..

I know the  FMRI will be included in the  Maquarie university HPPD study / Protocol

I initiated this process approximately 8 years ago when meeting Top Nero Psychiatrists in Australia.

Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD) Protocol: Multimodal Neuroimaging to uncover neurobiological pathogenesis — Macquarie University (mq.edu.au

Would love to share more on the study and protocol tho its confidential.

I suspect, one hypothesis for the etiology is  that... part of the brain effected is the occipital lobe, or seizure activity taking place within the occipital lobe. 

It would be great / I will suggest to the Doctors and Professors to include SPECT also.

Very cool, thanks for the share ! 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Spartan said:

C'est génial et fascinant..

Je sais que le FMRI sera inclus dans l'étude HPPD de l'université Maquarie / Protocole

J'ai initié ce processus il y a environ 8 ans lors de ma rencontre avec les meilleurs psychiatres de Nero en Australie.

Protocole du trouble persistant de la perception des hallucinogènes (HPPD): neuroimagerie multimodale pour découvrir la pathogenèse neurobiologique - Université Macquarie (mq.edu.au

J'adorerais partager plus sur l'étude et le protocole, même si c'est confidentiel.

Je soupçonne qu'une hypothèse pour l'étiologie est que... une partie du cerveau affectée est le lobe occipital, ou une activité épileptique se déroulant dans le lobe occipital. 

Ce serait formidable / Je suggérerai aux médecins et aux professeurs d'inclure également le SPECT.

Très cool, merci pour le partage ! 

 

 

Too bad you don’t share information about the fmri protocol. Some people may have access to it in their country, they could do the same protocol and it will reveal the hppd mystery

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Well if people have a specific interest I can put in touch with leading Professor running the study.

He can / has the power to approve sharing of confidential information.

As a patient I am bound to confidentiality. 

Any interested parties, reach out in a DM if you would like to persue further. 

Also an Fmri for one or two people would not be effective, it needs to be done for a group of people say 25 to 50 hppd patients for comparisons to be made..to make make the study effective / successful in finding the etiology. 

In this way many of us are in a diligent pursuit over many years in an effort to raise large amounts of money to make this study / research  happen asap.

 

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1 hour ago, Hppd13 said:

Too bad you don’t share information about the fmri protocol. Some people may have access to it in their country, they could do the same protocol and it will reveal the hppd mystery

I already took the time and initiative  to introduce you to the leading professor Via zoom conference call. that went for close to nearly 2 hours.

He has already answered all of your questions directly.

You were intent on doing the protocol for yourself only.

Though as he has already explained to you, it is a group HPPD patient collaboration only. You cannot buy your way into it. 

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  • 1 month later...

There's a new recent study on visual snow where a 7 T MRI scanner was used to image the brains of visual snow syndrome patients. However, it's not sure if the results are any meaningful since 7 T scanners are relatively new.

"Microstructure in patients with visual snow syndrome: an ultra-high field morphological and quantitative MRI study"
https://academic.oup.com/braincomms/article/4/4/fcac164/6614740

 

Conclusion of the study:

"It is clear that visual snow syndrome is a disorder of the central
nervous system. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remains elusive. Here, we reveal no evidence of gross
morphometry changes
in the visual snow syndrome brain, but
widespread changes in the microstructure of the GM, the most
notable of these occurring in caudal regions including the occipital
cortex. None of these changes are directly associated with the cooccurrence of migraine. While we were unable to determine the
specific brain tissue that underlies microstructural changes
, they
do focus further investigations, contributing significantly to our
understanding of visual snow syndrome."

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On 9/8/2022 at 12:26 PM, MentholFlavoring said:

There's a new recent study on visual snow where a 7 T MRI scanner was used to image the brains of visual snow syndrome patients. However, it's not sure if the results are any meaningful since 7 T scanners are relatively new.

"Microstructure in patients with visual snow syndrome: an ultra-high field morphological and quantitative MRI study"
https://academic.oup.com/braincomms/article/4/4/fcac164/6614740

 

Conclusion of the study:

"It is clear that visual snow syndrome is a disorder of the central
nervous system. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remains elusive. Here, we reveal no evidence of gross
morphometry changes
in the visual snow syndrome brain, but
widespread changes in the microstructure of the GM, the most
notable of these occurring in caudal regions including the occipital
cortex. None of these changes are directly associated with the cooccurrence of migraine. While we were unable to determine the
specific brain tissue that underlies microstructural changes
, they
do focus further investigations, contributing significantly to our
understanding of visual snow syndrome."

Wow holy shit, great find, not entirely sure what they mean by the terminology, but it sounds like a very reserved way of saying its bad. I think we all kind of knew that though lol. Fuck. Well at least its a move in the right direction. I'll see what I can find by what they mean by "microstructure" unless someone already knows.

 

Edit: "The aim of microstructural imaging is to quantify the properties of tissue components, such as myelin, axons, dendrites, glia, and to characterise pathological features such as demyelination, inflammation, axonal loss."

They say that there is no change in morphometry, so it would appear that maybe there is no actual structural damage, aka neuronal loss, at least not enough to change shape/size of the brain structure. Thats good.

They list axonal loss in microstructure, but as far as I have understood, once the axon is lost the neuron goes? Maybe someone can correct me on this?

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