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I believe thr only way to see anything on tests is through an quantitative EEg or perhaps spect and PET scans. Don't quote me on the last two tests cause I could be wrong, but I feel like I read something like that on the old board. I do know that those last tests are pretty difficult to find a place to do them.

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Yes, QEEG is needed to reveal the deviations in the brain waves. I´ve done regular EEG (twice), CT-scan and MRI. None of them has revealed anything.

I´m still waiting for a QEEG test, but it seems to be very hard to get an appointment for it.

Here´s a document regaring your question: EEG coherence in post-LSD visual hallucinations

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In reading various posts I've learned that scans of the brain do not reveal any damage.

How is this possible?

This question come up a lot (for obvious reasons)

The main issue comes down to the ‘coarseness’/crudeness of imaging. While the pictures look pretty cool and detailed, they are actually quite low in resolution. I got a copy of my MRI and each ‘slice’ is only 512 x 570 pixels – this is like trying to look at bacteria with a magnifying glass.

early_microscope-460x554.jpg

Asked a neurologist if a PET scan would be useful (as they do this in the UK for unclear cases of Parkinson’s), but he said the damage is too diffuse for the scan to be useful.

Damage has to be extensive to be visible with medical images. They are still good tests to have run, but they are limited. It may seem surprising (even disheartening) that our brain injuries are ‘mild’ – but in the spectrum of disease they are.

 

To put this in perspective, take Tetanus as an example. A toxin from a the bacteria Clostridium tetani irreversibly binds to GABA receptors, blocking inhibition inputs to neuronal dendrites. This leaves the excitation inputs (glutamate) dominant causing continuous activation of muscles. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetanospasmin

Opisthotonus_in_a_patient_suffering_from_tetanus_-_Painting_by_Sir_Charles_Bell_-_1809.jpg

This damage doesn’t show on medical imaging or EEG. And, of course it is so obvious from clinical signs that none are needed.

The only treatment of this ‘poisoning’ is the keep the person alive long enough for the neurons to grow new terminals and synapses.

 

Our condition is similar in that damage is microscopic. And any ‘cure’ involves time, the ability for the brain to repair, and finding helpful techniques to encourage this repair.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Our condition is similar in that damage is microscopic. And any ‘cure’ involves time, the ability for the brain to repair, and finding helpful techniques to encourage this repair.

This is the one of the most important statements on the site. And also the best advice.

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