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Possible reasons for HPPD based on psychedelic pharmacology


hansaadax
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As we all know psychedelics work through the 5HT-2A receptor, and one of the features of this is that they disrupt signal coupling in the thalamocortical feedback pathways which basically means it desyncs multisensory data input and stops the ability to discriminate and gate incoming signal flow to the cortex. This destabilization leads to "subtle flickering or pulsing of light intensity; geometric grids and matrices; the perception of halos or auras around light sources; increased luminosity of reflective objects; the softening of line and texture resolution; and the inability to hold sharp focal contrast between foreground and background in depth perception." So it's possible that psychedelics lead to persisting destabilization of this feedback loop giving us some of the symptoms listed here additionally this feedback pathway fills in our peripheral vision and even if it's "the rate of multisensory frame saturation or neutralization was slowed or interrupted by even a few milliseconds, incoming sensation would begin to layer over itself with increasing levels of smoothing, liquidity, and phantom frame echo decaying in the wake of sensation." This may explain why people with HPPD see things move in their peripheral, additionally the fact that psychedelics "stop the ability to discriminate and gate incoming signal flow" might explain visual snow since it's basically the inability to filter out what we'd normally see in our imperfect vision.

I have no degree in neuroscience or in pharmacology I am merely making assumptions based on the article I'm reading, If there are any faults in my theories please let me know I would like to improve my knowledge and understanding of pharmacology.

Article I'm referencing 
http://psychedelic-information-theory.com/5HT2A-Agonism-and-Multisensory-Binding

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