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Meds and their big mystery.


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I am really wondering about meds and how they work. I hear various things from doctors like some meds shouldn't do any damage and then people ending up with long-term problems and so on, so its hard to believe them when saying meds can help/cure and not just sooth the symptoms and at the same time make a person addicted for good.. but nevermind doctors for this moment.

 

My question is how do meds really work. I have seen people online saying they can't go off some meds, then I see people being cured by taking them for some shorter or longer period of time.

 

For example, a person having DP, due to overload of endegenous opioid, starts to take Naltrexone (opiod antagonist), it helps - the DP is reduced - does she have to take it for the rest of her life? Can she be possibly cured?

 

If not, let say the side effects become severe and she wants to quit taking Naltrexone - since Naltrexone can upregulate the opiod receptors, would that make her problem even worse than before - since her receptors are upregulated and she is gonna get flooded with natural opiodis again? (more receptors - bigger the effect of same amount of opiodis right?)

And what abour depression - what decides that some people can get off a medication and some can't? Would getting off the drug at some stage always cause increase in the symptoms of deppresion, due to regulation of receptors?

HPPD - there has been people reporting long-term remission of certain symptoms with like Keppra right? I think I have also seen people that didn't get any long-term benefits and basically they have to continue to take the drug to if they want to keep experiencing the good effect on HPPD symptoms.

 

Thanks.

 

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