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Test nootropics. I have an idea and the stuff. Need some advices.


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Hey everyone. Ok I tryed a lot of meds. And I will do it again, for the moment I can have a kind of normal life with : 
Parnate (50mg but I'm increasing the dose) ; Lamotrigin (600mg) ; Mirapex (5mg/day) and Klonopin when I need.
I have some difficulties to absorb the treatment so, I often need large doses.

This treatment increase my motivation and give to me a little bit more energy. But my DP/DR is still the same.

So I want to try nootropics, I have the following stuff :

Aniracetam : I will cite examine.com :  "It also increases blood flow and activity in the area of the brain known for this action, the association cortex."  And I searched, it is the only racetam acting like this). So I think it can be interesting, but alone he's may be too weak. Hence the presence of the second ingredient.

Vinpocetin : Vinpocetin increase the capacities of the blood rapidly and easily enters the brain ; which could allow the Aniracetam reach the associative cortex more easily, I hope.

DMAE : In the brain, DMAE is instead bound to phospholipids in place of choline to produce phosphatidyl-dimethylaminoethanol. This is then incorporated into nerve membranes, increasing fluidity and permeability, and acting as an antioxidant. Its role, in my idea, is to facilitate the passage of other molecules, especially the Aniracetam.

Citicholine : Because Aniracetam is cholinergic, Citicholine is there to support him. I don't like Alpha-GPC because I found too much choline can reduce (for me) efficacity of racetam. And citicholine as to Alpha-GPC is able to cross blood-brain barrier but not fully. And produce Uridine. Citicoline has also been shown to elevate ACTH independently from CRH levels and to amplify the release of other HPA axis hormones such as LH, FSH, GH and TSH in response to hypothalamic releasing factors. It is one of his qualities. And Daphne Simeon published a study on the hypothesis in DR/DP there may be have a malfunction in the HPA axis.

I take 5g/day of creatine, 1g during each meal and 2g after the sport. Citicholine can reduced ATP by glutamate so it will preserve my stock of ATP, very important for body but for brain too.
I have in stock : a lot of Nootropyl (piracetam) maybe adjunct to the stack to strengthen the AMPA allsoteric positive reinforcement ? (Need advices). I have Modafinil too but it doesn't seem help me (400mg/day).
I have also Inositol.  And Choline bitartrate, but it is for an other use. But all advices that can help me can help you.
After my stack be ready, I'll keep you informed of my evolution.

I don't think it can be a true treatment for ever but I wish it can maybe help for the "fog" of vision that induced by DR/DP.

Help us together !


(sorry for my poor english, I'm from Paris in france).

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