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Methylation (methyl B12, SAMe)


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I was reading this explanation by a Longecity member on COMT and methylation. 

Irrespective of HPPD, I started supplementing SAMe (for those that don't know, a methyl donor) a while back, as I suspected myself to be moderately histadelic (high histamine); I have symptoms and a niacin flush test suggested so too. I am quite convinced that SAMe makes my overall feeling of well-being better, having had periods on and off taking it. Histamine imbalances produce psychiatric symptoms, such as depression and anxiety. I wondered if an underlying histamine imbalance could be producing symptoms that I assumed were to do with HPPD. SAMe does seem to have a positive effect on my well-being - it certainly does not make me feel bad, which suggests that I am an undermethylator. 

 

Reading the thread above was the first time I heard of a link between methylation and COMT activity. This suggests a target for preventing the breakdown of catecholamines. Correcting histamine imbalances, particularly (just?) histapenia, might in turn help HPPD.

Derived from the thread;

High COMT Activity - Histapenia (Low Histamine) - Overmethylation - Lower Catecholamine Levels
[Low COMT Activity - Histadelia (High Histamine) -  Undermethylation - Higher Catecholamine Levels]


My own case doesn't suggest a link between methylation and HPPD, it in fact suggests I should be less susceptible to HPPD. I have the COMT polymorphism that suggests lower COMT activity i.e more dopamine. So, I benefit from a methyl donor, but this suggests I should have higher catecholamine/DA levels than usual.. it is strange then, that I have HPPD. Then again, perhaps not. I guess we can infer that for me, my DA issue does not lie with COMT activity? [That is not to say that my COMT activity has not been altered post-HPPD-onset. It could well have done. But it seems at least not at the level of genes, as I had the test done with HPPD.]

However, if you are an overmethylator, this would presumably contribute to your HPPD.

Perhaps it is an idea for people to get their histamine levels checked? If you were an overmethylator that would most definitely (I infer) contribute to HPPD. Also, if you had any significant histamine imbalances they would contribute to your sense of well-being anyway.


 

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Irrespective of HPPD, I started supplementing SAMe (for those that don't know, a methyl donor) a while back, as I suspected myself to be moderately histadelic (high histamine); I have symptoms and a niacin flush test suggested so too. 

[...]

Perhaps it is an idea for people to get their histamine levels checked? If you were an overmethylator that would most definitely (I infer) contribute to HPPD. Also, if you had any significant histamine imbalances they would contribute to your sense of well-being anyway.

Is there any actual evidence that the niacin flush is a good indicator? I have seen people touting this niacin flush test several times, but I've seen people calling it unfounded as well.

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Is there any actual evidence that the niacin flush is a good indicator? I have seen people touting this niacin flush test several times, but I've seen people calling it unfounded as well.

I've read people contest over it. Of course, the best thing to do would be to get your histamine levels tested, but this can be a hassle. It served for my purpose (I flushed at a low dose); it seemed to corroborate with my suspected histadelia, subsequent response to SAMe and DNA testing. I have always thought of it as something to take with a pinch of salt, but that will probably steer you in the right direction. 

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